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The Body Electric & Hydration

The Body Electric When you think about your body, you probably think of it as strictly biology, rather than an electrical system with positive and negative charges. As it turns out, our bodies run a lot more like an electrical machine than most people realize. Within every human body is an electrical panel, and our vital functions take place as a result of electrical signals that are sent through the human electrical board. This electrical system is more important for life than most people give it credit for. You have probably heard of electrolytes and how they are crucial for athletes and people who are dehydrated, but there is a lot more to electrolytes than just grabbing a sports drink off the shelf.  To understand the importance of electrolytes, you have to think about the body as an electrical system with power outlets inside the tissue and organs. The electricity that allows us to move and think and breath must be conducted in the right way — and that’s where electrolytes come into play. What is an Electrolyte? An electrolyte is a positively charged or negatively charged ion within the body. When an electrolyte is combined with fluid inside our bodies, it gains a negative or positive charge. Some of the most important electrolytes are sodium, potassium, and magnesium, but there are many more that work to keep our electrical system functioning. When any one of these minerals is outside of the body in their dry form, they don’t really do much for us. But as soon as they come into contact with fluids in the body, they become charged and play an essential role in our bio-electrical system. What do Electrolytes do? The primary role of electrolytes is to maintain fluid balance. Our bodies are made up of 70% water, of which almost two-thirds resides inside of the cells (intracellular fluid), and the other third lies outside of the cells, (extracellular fluid). The fluctuation of water in and out of the cell determines whether the electrical charges are positive or negative. The transfer of energy between positively charged and negatively charged energy is what creates electricity in the body. These electric signals allow our hearts to beat, our muscle to contracts, and our lungs to involuntarily breath. Cells can adjust their fluid content simply by the number of electrolytes that are taken in. If you’re taking in more of certain electrolytes, there will be an influx (flowing in) of water being drawn into cells, while a decrease in some electrolytes will cause an efflux (flowing out) of water from a cell. Electrolyte balance is very important for the homeostasis and the ability of the whole body to function correctly. Electrolytes and…

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The Body Electric

When you think about your body, you probably think of it as strictly biology, rather than an electrical system with positive and negative charges. As it turns out, our bodies run a lot more like an electrical machine than most people realize. Within every human body is an electrical panel, and our vital functions take place as a result of electrical signals that are sent through the human electrical board. This electrical system is more important for life than most people give it credit for.

You have probably heard of electrolytes and how they are crucial for athletes and people who are dehydrated, but there is a lot more to electrolytes than just grabbing a sports drink off the shelf.  To understand the importance of electrolytes, you have to think about the body as an electrical system with power outlets inside the tissue and organs. The electricity that allows us to move and think and breath must be conducted in the right way — and that’s where electrolytes come into play.

What is an Electrolyte?

An electrolyte is a positively charged or negatively charged ion within the body. When an electrolyte is combined with fluid inside our bodies, it gains a negative or positive charge. Some of the most important electrolytes are sodium, potassium, and magnesium, but there are many more that work to keep our electrical system functioning. When any one of these minerals is outside of the body in their dry form, they don’t really do much for us. But as soon as they come into contact with fluids in the body, they become charged and play an essential role in our bio-electrical system.

What do Electrolytes do?

The primary role of electrolytes is to maintain fluid balance. Our bodies are made up of 70% water, of which almost two-thirds resides inside of the cells (intracellular fluid), and the other third lies outside of the cells, (extracellular fluid). The fluctuation of water in and out of the cell determines whether the electrical charges are positive or negative. The transfer of energy between positively charged and negatively charged energy is what creates electricity in the body. These electric signals allow our hearts to beat, our muscle to contracts, and our lungs to involuntarily breath.

Cells can adjust their fluid content simply by the number of electrolytes that are taken in. If you’re taking in more of certain electrolytes, there will be an influx (flowing in) of water being drawn into cells, while a decrease in some electrolytes will cause an efflux (flowing out) of water from a cell. Electrolyte balance is very important for the homeostasis and the ability of the whole body to function correctly.

Electrolytes and Hydration

You body monitors and balances electrolytes by paying attention to changes in the extracellular fluid like the blood. Changes in fluid intake and electrolyte intake can disrupt or maintain this balance.  Water can end up compartmentalized and lose its polarity causing bloating or issues with cramping.  Igniting these important electrolytes can improve the hydration process.  Fluid and electrolyte replacement is important after exercise and daily exertion. 

At this point, you might be thinking that all you need for better cellular hydration is to eat some salt, but that won’t cut it. Taking the wrong balance of electrolytes can cause you to end up having too much of an efflux or an influx of water to and from the cells, which can throw off voltage for the whole body. You need the right amounts of trace minerals to trigger optimal hydration. ORAL I.V. uses a BioCharged Delivery System that maximizes the electric charges that allow your cells to hydrate by using the smallest and right amounts of minerals and structured water. We work to make the ingredients in the BioCharged Delivery System have the highest bio-electrical potential, allowing the water and minerals to better work within your body’s electrical system. This combination of minerals and structured water works to trigger cell hydration almost immediately, allowing your body to better metabolize water and use it more efficiently. ORAL I.V. doesn’t merely replace electrolytes like other hydration products and sports drinks. Our formula actives your water to make it work better for you.

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